7741 SW 62nd Ave, South Miami, FL 33143

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What Can I Do to Stop Grinding My Teeth?

 If stress is causing you to grind your teeth, ask your doctor or dentist about options to reduce your stress. Attending stress counseling, starting an exercise program, seeing a physical therapist, or obtaining a prescription for muscle relaxants are among some of the options that may be offered.

Your dentist can fit you with a mouth guard to protect your teeth from grinding during sleep. If a sleeping disorder is causing the grinding, treating it may reduce or eliminate the grinding habit.

Tags: South Miami Family Dental Sleep Apnea Treatment Alvaro Ordonez DDS TMJ Healthy Smiles for All May Better Sleep Month Sleep apnea Mouthguard, Night Guard

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Do I Grind?

Why Do People Grind Their Teeth?

Although teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety, it often occurs during sleep and is more likely caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth. It can also be caused by a sleep disorder such as sleep apnea.

How Do I Find Out if I Grind My Teeth?

Tags: South Miami Family Dental Alvaro Ordonez DDS May Better Sleep Month Child Bruxism Grinding Teeth Adult Bruxism

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The Importance of Sleep and Good Dental Hygiene

Are you aware of how your oral health habits can impact your ability to get sufficient rest?

The research and statistics do show poor oral health can keep you awake at night! But we are speaking about far more than just poor dental hygiene here. It is possible your problems might not be related to bad dental habits at all. If you’re an individual who suffers from extreme anxiety or who is under a great deal of stress—this will come through in your sleep at night. But how is this possible?

Tags: South Miami Family Dental AlvaroOrdonezDDS Healthy Smiles for All Oral Health Better Sleep Month

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More Tips for keep your Family's Healthy Teeth - Part 2

Keep your family’s teeth and gums healthy is a common concern in many homes, and you have so many good reasons to:

  • Sparkling smiles.
  • Being able to chew for good nutrition.
  • Avoiding toothaches and discomfort.

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Nutrition Tips for Help your family's Healthy Teeth

Eat smart

At every age, a healthy diet is essential to healthy teeth and gums. A well-balanced diet of whole foods -- including grains, nuts, fruits and vegetables, and dairy products -- will provide all the nutrients you need. Some researchers believe that omega-3 fats, the kind found in fish, may also reduce inflammation, thereby lowering risk of gum disease, says Anthony M. Iacopino, DMD, PhD, dean of the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

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Tips for Help to keep your family's Healthy Teeth - Part 3

Keep the family’s teeth and gums healthy is a common concern in many homes, and you have so many good reasons to:

  • You love their sparkling smiles.
  • You want them being able to chew for good nutrition.
  • Avoiding toothaches and discomfort.

Fortunately, there are simple ways to keep teeth strong and healthy from childhood to old age. Here’s how:

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happy-family.jpg

Tips for Family's Healthy Teeth - Part 1

Keep your family’s teeth and gums healthy is a common concern in many homes, and you have so many good reasons to:

  • Sparkling smiles.
  • Being able to chew for good nutrition.
  • Avoiding toothaches and discomfort.

New research suggests that gum disease can lead to other problems in the body, including increased risk of heart disease, among other health issues.

Fortunately, there are simple ways to keep teeth strong and healthy from childhood to old age. Here’s how:

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Tips for Help to keep your family's Healthy Teeth - Part 4

Make an appointment with your dentist.

Most experts recommend a dental check-up every 6 months -- more often if you have problems like gum disease. During a routine exam, your dentist or dental hygienist removes plaque build-up that you can’t brush or floss away and look for signs of decay. A regular dental exam also spots:

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Savor the flavor of eating right in the National Nutrition Month

Dentists can help patients 'savor the flavor' of healthy eating

March is National Nutrition Month, an annual campaign sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. It's a good time to remind that dentists have a high  role in educating patients about proper nutrition.

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Do you know the symptoms of the Gingivitis? Ask your dentist now!

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums (gingiva). It commonly occurs because of films of bacteria that accumulate on the teeth - plaque; this type is called plaque-induced gingivitis

What are the signs and symptoms of gingivitis?

A symptom that a patient can experiment could be painful gums, a sign is something everybody, including the doctor or nurse can see, such as swelling.

In mild cases of gingivitis there may be no discomfort or noticeable symptoms.

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Why good dental hygiene is important

Most of us are aware that poor dental hygiene can lead to tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath - but not brushing your teeth could also have consequences for more serious illnesses.

Here some we have to watch carefully if we don't have good habits of oral hygiene:

Heart disease

The researchers found that heart disease risk increased because - in people who have bleeding gums - bacteria from the mouth is able to enter the bloodstream and stick to platelets, which can then form blood clots, interrupting the flow of blood to the heart and triggering a heart attack.

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Study Suggests Link Between Gum Disease, Breast Cancer Risk

Gum disease might increase the risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women, particularly those who smoke, a new study suggests.

Women with gum disease appeared to have a 14 percent overall increased risk for breast cancer, compared to women without gum disease. And that increased risk seemed to jump to more than 30 percent if they also smoked or had smoked in the past 20 years, researchers said.

These findings are useful in providing new insight into what causes breast cancer," said lead author Jo Freudenheim, a professor of epidemiology at the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions in New York.

Read the full article here

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Diabetes and Oral Health

How Does Diabetes Affect the Mouth?

People who have diabetes know the disease can harm the eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Did you know diabetes can also cause problems in your mouth?

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