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Tips for Family's Healthy Teeth - Part 1

Keep your family’s teeth and gums healthy is a common concern in many homes, and you have so many good reasons to:

  • Sparkling smiles.
  • Being able to chew for good nutrition.
  • Avoiding toothaches and discomfort.

New research suggests that gum disease can lead to other problems in the body, including increased risk of heart disease, among other health issues.

Fortunately, there are simple ways to keep teeth strong and healthy from childhood to old age. Here’s how:

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Tips for Help to keep your family's Healthy Teeth - Part 4

Make an appointment with your dentist.

Most experts recommend a dental check-up every 6 months -- more often if you have problems like gum disease. During a routine exam, your dentist or dental hygienist removes plaque build-up that you can’t brush or floss away and look for signs of decay. A regular dental exam also spots:

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Savor the flavor of eating right in the National Nutrition Month

Dentists can help patients 'savor the flavor' of healthy eating

March is National Nutrition Month, an annual campaign sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. It's a good time to remind that dentists have a high  role in educating patients about proper nutrition.

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Do you know the symptoms of the Gingivitis? Ask your dentist now!

Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums (gingiva). It commonly occurs because of films of bacteria that accumulate on the teeth - plaque; this type is called plaque-induced gingivitis

What are the signs and symptoms of gingivitis?

A symptom that a patient can experiment could be painful gums, a sign is something everybody, including the doctor or nurse can see, such as swelling.

In mild cases of gingivitis there may be no discomfort or noticeable symptoms.

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Why good dental hygiene is important

Most of us are aware that poor dental hygiene can lead to tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath - but not brushing your teeth could also have consequences for more serious illnesses.

Here some we have to watch carefully if we don't have good habits of oral hygiene:

Heart disease

The researchers found that heart disease risk increased because - in people who have bleeding gums - bacteria from the mouth is able to enter the bloodstream and stick to platelets, which can then form blood clots, interrupting the flow of blood to the heart and triggering a heart attack.

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Study Suggests Link Between Gum Disease, Breast Cancer Risk

Gum disease might increase the risk for breast cancer among postmenopausal women, particularly those who smoke, a new study suggests.

Women with gum disease appeared to have a 14 percent overall increased risk for breast cancer, compared to women without gum disease. And that increased risk seemed to jump to more than 30 percent if they also smoked or had smoked in the past 20 years, researchers said.

These findings are useful in providing new insight into what causes breast cancer," said lead author Jo Freudenheim, a professor of epidemiology at the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions in New York.

Read the full article here

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Diabetes and Oral Health

How Does Diabetes Affect the Mouth?

People who have diabetes know the disease can harm the eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Did you know diabetes can also cause problems in your mouth?

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Diabetes: Dental Tips

Diabetes can cause serious problems in your mouth. You can do something about it.

If you have diabetes, make sure you take care of your mouth. People with diabetes are at risk for mouth infections, especially periodontal (gum) disease. Periodontal disease can damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing problems. Some people with serious gum disease lose their teeth. Periodontal disease may also make it hard to control your blood glucose (blood sugar).

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Some facts about Periodontal Disease

Periodontal (gum) disease is an infection of the tissues that hold your teeth in place. It's typically caused by poor brushing and flossing habits that allow plaque—a sticky film of bacteria—to build up on the teeth and harden. In advanced stages, periodontal disease can lead to sore, bleeding gums; painful chewing problems; and even tooth loss.

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3D Printed Teeth Could Fight Bacteria

Researchers in the Netherlands are making dental implants that kill microbes that settle on them.

The researchers printed teeth with and without antimicrobial properties to test their material. They then put tooth decay-causing bacteria on the samples. More than 99 percent of the bacteria died on the treated teeth, while only about 1 percent were killed on the untreated ones.

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How to manage the fear to the dentist

One in four of us dreads a visit to the dentist, but there are ways to overcome your fear.

Being afraid of the dentist means different things to different people. Maybe it's the thought that treatment will hurt, or that the sounds and smells bring back memories of bad experiences as a child.

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The fear to the dentist

One in four of us dreads a visit to the dentist, but there are ways to overcome your fear.

Being afraid of the dentist means different things to different people. Maybe it's the thought that treatment will hurt, or that the sounds and smells bring back memories of bad experiences as a child.

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Smart Questions to Ask Your Dentist

Have a dental appointment scheduled sometime soon? Sit back, relax and get ready to open your mouth – but not just to have it examined! Taking your smile to the next level involves more than just a routine checkup and cleaning; for truly noticeable changes, you'll need to start off by having an in-depth chat with your dentist. Make the most out of your next visit by asking these important questions:

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A Mouthguard That Could Measure Concussions

Professional football, rugby, and other contact sports could benefit from it

Prompted by his own injuries, Gonzales, an MBA student at ASU, has developed FITGuard, along with fellow ASU grad Bob Merriman. The mouth guard is equipped with sensors that measure the force of a hit to the head and calculate the likelihood of a concussion based on age, gender and medical history.

Read the full article on Smithsonian Magazine

Tags: Alvaro Ordonez DDS Mouthguard, Oral Health Smithsonianmag Dentist Innovation

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